Bruce Anderson: Drift

May 25 - August 27, 2017

Opening: Friday, May 26 @ 7:30pm

Bruce Anderson, Continental Drift: He Came With a Name, 2009, oil on canvas, 48 x 72 inches, Private Collection.

Bruce Anderson, Continental Drift: He Came With a Name, 2009, oil on canvas, 48 x 72 inches, Private Collection.

Beautiful renderings of horses in both realistic and conceptual landscapes are presented in the exhibition Drift. Featuring the paintings of Regina artist Bruce Anderson, the exhibition presents two bodies of work created within a ten year period, titled Under a Big Sky (2004-2009) and Continental Drift (2009-2014). Under a Big Sky offers a series of diptychs, pairings of classically rendered and hauntingly, beautiful landscapes and skyscapes. Classic prairies skies, either endlessly blue with billowing white clouds or darkened and dramatic with approaching storms, are juxtaposed with images of lone horses within barren landscapes. Depictions of barbed-wire or wooden fences suggest that these are controlled environments – corals or pastures – an indication of the horse’s domestic relationship with humans. Continental Drift presents viewers with a visual collage. By superimposing realistic images of horses on historical maps, Anderson places the horses within conceptual and political landscapes where borders are drawn and places are named. Both of these series break with landscape painting’s traditional formats, juxtaposing unexpected elements and offering layered images to be evocative.


Grant McConnell: Rogue Royal

May 25 - August 27, 2017

Opening: Friday, May 26 @ 7:30pm

Grant McConnell, Royal Tour, Green Gables, acrylic on wood, 2017

Grant McConnell, Royal Tour, Green Gables, acrylic on wood, 2017

This exhibition features paintings and mixed media works on the subject of royal personages, as seen through European historical oil painting, gone rogue. Derived from an ongoing investigation into the work of Diego Velasquez, particularly his royal portrait, Las Meninas, Grant McConnell positions Velasquez’s subjects within a Canadian historical context. Canada, in all of its crude beauty, becomes the new ground for these royal figures, who are given new purpose in the colonies. 

Presenting the work of this significant Saskatchewan contemporary painter, this exhibition will encourage dialogue and inquiry into the direction of contemporary painting in Saskatchewan and Canada, historical art references, as well as the history of European settlement and colonization of Canada.


Global Warning Initiative

Art Made from Garbage by Moose Jaw Youth

May 31 - August 21, 2017

Wednesday, May 31

Award presentation in the theatre @ 1:30pm

Reception to follow in the lobby @ 2:30pm

Living in a Garbage Garden, Club de Bricolage, Grades 3-5, Ecole St. Margaret School, paper, plastic, tinfoil, lunch wrappers, school garbage, 205 x 116 x 214 cm, 2017

Living in a Garbage Garden, Club de Bricolage, Grades 3-5, Ecole St. Margaret School, paper, plastic, tinfoil, lunch wrappers, school garbage, 205 x 116 x 214 cm, 2017


Heather Cline: Quiet Stories from Canadian Places - Canada 150 

March 3 - May 14, 2017

Opening: Friday, March 3 @ 7:30pm

Artist Talk: Saturday, May 13 @ 1:30pm

Heather Cline, Meeting Places, acrylic on panel, 36 x 48, 2016

Heather Cline, Meeting Places, acrylic on panel, 36 x 48, 2016

Cline’s series of paintings and new media works, entitled Quiet Stories from Canadian Places, a touring exhibition in 2017 in response to Canada’s 150th anniversary celebrations, explores shifting the traditional role that painting has played in documenting history from official portraiture and pivotal historical moments to documenting Canadian places that are significant to everyday people and simple moments. It also explores how the public interacts with the work creating a space of active viewing as the public reflects on the paintings in relation to the audio content.

 The project involves interviewing local residents in communities across Canada, collecting personal and regional history as an audio component.  The resulting exhibition will feature salon style groupings of small to mid-scale paintings of different locations across Canada, including Moose Jaw, while the audio component will create sound spots that viewers will enter as they view the paintings. Being exhibited in MJM&AG’s museum from March 3 to May 14, the exhibition creates a space for contemporary art, oral traditions of storytelling and history to intersect.

http://www.heathercline.ca/projects/quiet-stories


John Kissick: The Boom Bits

February 3 - May 7, 2017

Opening: Fri. Feb. 10 @ 7:30pm

John Kissick, The Boom Bit, oil and acrylic paint, 168 X 183 cm, 2011  

John Kissick, The Boom Bit, oil and acrylic paint, 168 X 183 cm, 2011

 

The touring exhibition John Kissick: The Boom Bits features paintings and prints from the last five years in the abstract painter's critically acclaimed practice. The survey of works traces the artist's recent development of hybrid pictorial motifs and art historical references through the lenses of contemporary pop culture, surrealism and formal abstraction.

Known primarily as a painter and writer, John has an extensive exhibition record, with over 30 solo exhibitions in Canada, the US, and Germany. He received a BFA from Queen’s University and an MFA from Cornell University and has held academic appointments at the University of Guelph (where he currently teaches), Ontario College of Art + Design, Penn State University and The University of Ulster at Belfast. His work has also been featured in important survey exhibitions on contemporary painting, and is held in numerous public collections.

The exhibition was organized by the Thames Art Gallery and curated by Carl Lavoy, in collaboration with the Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery, Esplanade Art Gallery (Medicine Hat, AB), Art Gallery of Guelph and the Judith & Norman Alix Art Gallery (Sarnia, ON).


Audrey Dreaver: No, I Do Not Speak Cree

February 3 - May 7, 2017

Opening: Fri. Feb. 10 @ 7:30pm

Artist Talk: Sat. Feb. 11 @ 1:30pm

Audrey Dreaver, The Phone Call, acrylic on canvas, 152.5 X 152.5 cm, 2015

Audrey Dreaver, The Phone Call, acrylic on canvas, 152.5 X 152.5 cm, 2015

NO. I do not speak Cree is an exhibition of paintings, prints and sculptures that expresses and examines artist Audrey Dreaver’s experience with Cree language loss. Through the works, Dreaver considers her place within her Cree culture and community, and whether her inability to speak Cree means that she is less Cree. This exhibition examines the reasons her family lost their language, and the effect this cultural loss has on people like Dreaver, other Crees who are not fluent in their language. Exploring the emotional and psychological impact of language loss on identity, Dreaver’s work considers the current place of hybridity for many Cree peoples; existing in a new Cree paradigm where fluency in their language is no longer an essential element of Cree survival. 

Audrey Dreaver is Plains Cree and grew up in Prince Albert. Her family comes from the Mistawasis and Ahtahkakoop Cree Nations of Saskatchewan. Dreaver received her MFA in painting from the University of Regina (2015), and her BFA in painting, printmaking, and sculpture, and BA in Museum Studies (curating) from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


KEEPSAKES OF CONFLICT: Trench Art and Other Canadian War-Related Craft

September 15 - December 31, 2016

Organized by the MJMAG; Guest Curated by Heather Smith

Mills Bomb Desk Set, Collection of Canadian War Museum.

Mills Bomb Desk Set, Collection of Canadian War Museum.

Trench art is defined as any item made by soldiers, prisoners of war and civilians, from war material directly, or any other material, as long as it and they are associated with armed conflict or its consequences. The 100th anniversary of the First World War has been an opportunity for the Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery (MJM&AG) to examine the little-studied area of Canadian craft related to war. This traveling exhibition was organized by the MJM&AG and guest curated by Heather Smith. MJM&AG acknowledges the generous funding support provided by the Department of Canadian Heritage through the Museums Assistance Program and sponsorship by the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 59.

L’art des tranchées se définit comme le domaine qui englobe tout objet fabriqué par des soldats, des prisonniers de guerre ou des civils, à partir de matériel de guerre ou de quelque autre matériau, pourvu que l’objet et son créateur soient associés au conflit armé ou à ses conséquences. La commémoration du centenaire de la Première Guerre mondiale a offert au Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery l’occasion de se pencher sur un aspect jusqu’à présent peu étudié de l’artisanat canadien lié aux conflits armés. Cette exposition itinérante a été réalisée par le Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery, sous la direction de la commissaire Heather Smith. Nous désirons signaler la généreuse contribution du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, dans le cadre de son Programme d’aide aux musées and par la Légion Royale Canadien 59.


DOUGLAS BENTHAM: The Tablets

September 15 - December 31, 2016

Organized by MJMAG and the Art Gallery of Swift Current; Curated by Jennifer McRorie and Kim Houghtaling

The Tablets, Installation, 16 1/2 feet X 22 feet, 2016.

The Tablets, Installation, 16 1/2 feet X 22 feet, 2016.

With an international reputation spanning more than four decades, Saskatoon-based sculptor Douglas Bentham’s newest exhibition The Tablets represents the artist’s first installation piece. Comprised of 32 sculptural works installed in symmetrical rows, The Tablets exhibit presents a collection of metal assemblages of richly textured bronze and brass panels infused with fractured text, numbers and dates. The presentation of these tablet-like constructions contributes to a layered, overarching narrative of time, history, mortality and the general fragility of the human condition.


DOUGLAS BENTHAM: Poetry In Steel

MJM&AG Permanent Collection

September 15 - December 31, 2016

Piece #27, Steel, 1.5 X 6.4 X 3.6 feet. 1975. Collection of the MJM&AG.

Piece #27, Steel, 1.5 X 6.4 X 3.6 feet. 1975. Collection of the MJM&AG.

Alongside The Tablets, Douglas Bentham's works from the MJM&AG Permanent Collection provide a glimpse into the evolution of this artist's distinctive sculptural practice. Known for his large welded-metal structures, Bentham is recognized as one of Canada's most prominent sculptors and has made a profound contribution to modernist art and sculpture in Saskatchewan and Canada. 


IN THE LOBBY

Moose Jaw Art Guild

Looking Forward: Creating Our Future

November 3 - December 31, 2016

Installation of the 2016 exhibition.

Installation of the 2016 exhibition.

The Moose Jaw Art Guild organization has been a long and accommodating association between the Moose Jaw Art Guild and the MJM&AG which expresses itself in the fact that this annual exhibition is the longest continuous collaboration for the MJM&AG. There are 23 artists featured in this 30 piece exhibition. This year Jean Bell, Debbie Blash, Laura Catling, Amy Cozma, Beth Crabb, Jean Crozier, Lee Fast, Destiny Gibney, Patrick A. Hall, Donna Hanslien, Anna Hergert, Julia Hu, Roxanne Johnston, J. B. Kaiser, Fred Kaita, Ciera Mottus, Cindy Perreault, Grace Popyuk, Erica Silzer, Jean Tkatch, Crystal Thorburn, Karen Walpole and Karen Whitney participated in the 2016 exhibition.

Exhibition sponsored by Parsons and Dietrich Pottery


IN THE LOBBY

New Acquisitions: MJM&AG Permanent Collection

August 30 - October 23, 2016

Piece #27, Steel, 1.5 X 6.4 X 3.6 feet. 1975. Collection of the MJM&AG.

Piece #27, Steel, 1.5 X 6.4 X 3.6 feet. 1975. Collection of the MJM&AG.

This exhibition features works by five Saskatchewan artists, which are new acquisitions to the Permanent Collection. The artists featured are Heather Benning, Robert Froese, Gabriela Garcia Luna, Diane Lara, and Russell Mang.


Kent Tate: Movies for a Pulsing Earth

April 28 - August 28, 2016

Installation shot at the MJM&AG in 2016

Installation shot at the MJM&AG in 2016

 

Organized by the Art Gallery of Swift Current; Curated by Kim Houghtaling

The exhibition Movies for a Pulsing Earth is the culmination of years of travel, observation and artmaking by Kent Tate in its presentation of video, audio and sculpture. Exploring places both far and near, real or imagined, Tate captures these landscapes by camera over a span of time, filming them in motion and high definition. Images transition from one view to another, moving us through a sequence of visual experiences. As the viewer, we are held in time while we gaze upon something phenomenal. The messages are in the imagery and their meanings flood over us. Profoundly inspired by the beauty in nature and passionately concerned about the consequences human effect has on earth, Kent Tate is driven to share what he witnesses through his camera.

Visit: www.pulsingearth.ca


Zachari Logan - A Natural History of Unnatural Things

April 28 - August 28, 2016

Leshy 2, pastel on black paper, 2014.

Leshy 2, pastel on black paper, 2014.

Organized by the Art Gallery of Regina; Curated by Holly Fay.

Zachari Logan’s work explores the intersections between masculinity, identity, memory and place. Through a combination of drawing, ceramics and installation practices, the work in this exhibition embodies a confluence of the human form with flora and fauna; referring to various art-historical sources, while reflecting contemporary meditations on nature.


Global Warning

May 31 - August 22, 2016

Josée Pelletier, Mr. B.E.A.R.  (Bearly Environmentally Aware Residents), cotton, foil, metal, paper, plastic, cardboard , polyester, 121.92 x 71.12 x 40.64 cm, 2016.

Josée Pelletier, Mr. B.E.A.R.  (Bearly Environmentally Aware Residents), cotton, foil, metal, paper, plastic, cardboard , polyester, 121.92 x 71.12 x 40.64 cm, 2016.

In the summer of 2015, the MJM&AG exhibited Global Warning! It featured art works made by students from Albert E. Peacock Collegiate and Riverview Collegiate, which were comprised of re-purposed refuse that was destined for the landfill and collected by the students.

This exhibition, which explored the ramifications of our consumer culture, was a collaborative project involving the following city-based organizations: Moose Jaw South Central Regional Intersectoral Committee (AXIS), Beautifi Moose Jaw, the City of Moose Jaw, the schools of Prairies South School Division No. 210, Visual Art Club Project 104, and the Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery.


Ditch- Diving, A Liminal Guide To Botanicals: Selections from the MJM& AG Permanent Collection

April 28 - May 22, 2016

Organized by the MJM&AG; Curated by Zachari Logan

MJM&AG Foyer Gallery


Joe Fafard: Retailles

January 21 - April 10, 2016

Cock & Pony Story,steel laser out-cuts, powder coated, 16 1/2'' x 21'' x 5'', 2012

Cock & Pony Story,steel laser out-cuts, powder coated, 16 1/2'' x 21'' x 5'', 2012

Internationally renowned, Joe Fafard is one of Canada’s most recognized and prolific artists. Spanning decades, Fafard’s artistic practice is always evolving, driven by his endless experimentation with subject matter, media, process and technology. Whether in clay, bronze or steel sculpture or in drawing and printmaking, Fafard’s work is characterized by his connection to his rural roots, his reverence for art history, his inquiry into form and his interest in three-dimensional illusion and perspective. The exhibition Retailles offers an insight into Fafard’s exploration of the laser-cut process and his creative renderings of its by-products in this collection of laser-cut and welded metal sculptures along with embossed and woodcut prints. French for scraps or trimmings, that which is cut away, Retailles not only references the act of removing the negative from positive space to create form, but refers to the act of recycling these “out-cuts” to create new works.   Drawing features prominently in this exhibition, from the reduction of form to line in both three-dimensional and two-dimensional spaces to the Matisse-like cut-outs and the creation of recycled, sculptural collage.


Joe Fafard: Sunny Ways

January 21 - April 10, 2016

Organized by Slate Fine Art Gallery

MJM&AG Foyer Gallery

Peggy, edition 5/7, bronze, powder coated, 2004.

Peggy, edition 5/7, bronze, powder coated, 2004.


Lucien Durey and Katie Kozak: Baba's House

December 1, 2015 - April 3, 2016

Curated by Blair Fornwald and tour organized by Dunlop Art Gallery

Lucien Durey and Katie Kozak, March 27 (Rubber Rings), 2013, LightJet print face-mounted to acrylic glass.

Lucien Durey and Katie Kozak, March 27 (Rubber Rings), 2013, LightJet print face-mounted to acrylic glass.

In fall 2012, artists Lucien Durey and Katie Kozak moved to the northern Saskatchewan town of Creighton to take up a self-directed residency in the home of Kozak’s Ukrainian-Canadian grandmother, Sophie Ostrowski. During this time, they produced scanned compositions from materials found in Ostrowski’s home, producing works with surprising depth and formal restraint. Thoughtful, emotionally resonant, and quietly funny, the resulting collection of works form a loving portrait of this specific individual. Ostrowski’s story, however, evokes commonly shared Saskatchewan experiences of rural prairie life and homesteading, the hybridization of second-generation Canadian identities, family history, and intergenerational friendship and exchange.

Featuring Ukrainian-Canadian artifacts from the MJM&AG heritage collection in collaboration with the artworks, this exhibit will connect with Moose Jaw audiences and encourage inquiry into immigrant and pioneering experiences.

Lucien Durey is a visual artist and singer working in Saskatchewan and Vancouver. Drawing from personal and popular experience, his practice explores themes of authenticity and compensation through performance, assemblage/installation, and digital processes. Durey holds a BFA from Emily Carr University of Art and Design and an MFA in Interdisciplinary Studies from Vancouver's SFU School for the Contemporary Arts. He has exhibited in Saskatchewan, Vancouver, Portland and New York.

Katie Kozak is a Creighton, Saskatchewan artist of Métis and Ukrainian descent, whose work is a thoughtful blend of visual art and science. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Victoria and attended Emily Carr University of Art and Design from 2009 through 2012. She has exhibited artworks in the Prairies and Western Canada.


Annual Moose Jaw Art Guild Exhibition - "Flow"

December 3, 2015 to January 3, 2016

 

Anna Hergert, The Flow Below, 16" X 24", on matte paper, 2015

Anna Hergert, The Flow Below, 16" X 24", on matte paper, 2015

Current members will exhibit their work at this 47th annual exhibition.

Members in the exhibition: Jean Bell, Debbie Blash, Laura Catling, Beth Crabb, Jean Crozier, Julie Darychuk, Lee Fast, Patrick Hall, Donna Hanslien, Anna Hergert, Roxanne Johnston, Jerry Kaiser, Marlene McBain, Ciera Mottus, Cindy Perreault, Grace Popyuk, Cathy Sinclair, Crystal Thorburn, Jean Tkatch, Karen Walpole, Rhonda-Lynn Wandler, Karen Whitney


Heather Benning - A Prairie Gothic: Let Our Fields Be Broader, But Our Nights So Much Darker

September 25, 2015 to January 3, 2016

 

Heather Benning, The Altar, Cedar, pine, chipboard, stain, oil paint, polyurethane plastic, fiberglass resin, polyester resin, glue, tin foil, silk flowers, wheat, yarn, wire, metal, Styrofoam, rocks, auto-body paste, apoxi-sculpt, paper. 255cm x 220cm x 61cm. 2013

Heather Benning, The Altar, Cedar, pine, chipboard, stain, oil paint, polyurethane plastic, fiberglass resin, polyester resin, glue, tin foil, silk flowers, wheat, yarn, wire, metal, Styrofoam, rocks, auto-body paste, apoxi-sculpt, paper. 255cm x 220cm x 61cm. 2013

Saskatchewan artist Heather Benning has a growing international reputation for producing large-scale, site-specific installations within natural environments, presenting interventions in outdoor locations and abandoned and decaying architectural spaces. Another focus of her practice is creating gallery-based installations and, most recently, working in video. It is these latter practices that will be featured in the exhibition A Prairie Gothic: Let Our Fields Be Broader, But Our Nights So Much Darker, co-organized by the Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery and the Art Gallery of Swift Current. Presenting four bodies of work and her new film, The Dollhouse, the exhibition offers viewers intricately woven narratives that address notions of place, loss, the perceived ‘otherness’ of rural life and the construction of gender and femininity. Each series contributes to an overarching narrative of the prairie gothic. Stories of innocence, haunting memories and romantic ideals of settler life on the prairies are intertwined with dark narratives and tragic loss. Benning presents viewers with iconic images and monuments of prairie rural life that not only acknowledge the passing of an era, the loss of a connection to our rural roots, idyllic dreams that are never realized and the inevitability of change, but also reflect a sensitivity and respect for the individual lives and stories, whether real or imagined, that collectively contribute towards a prairie sensibility or even mythology.

The exhibition will tour to the Art Gallery of Swift Current in fall 2016 and the Mann Art Gallery in Prince Albert in 2017.


Hansen-Ross Pottery: Pioneering Fine Craft on the Canadian Prairie

April 30 to September 6, 2015

Hansen-Ross Pottery, Three Gnome Pots, centre vase made by Brian Ring while working with Hansen-Ross Pottery, Stoneware, Glaze, L to R: 1986, 1973, 2001, 7 X 5 cm, 6 X 8 cm, 5 X 5 cm, Collection of Maureen Knox.

Hansen-Ross Pottery, Three Gnome Pots, centre vase made by Brian Ring while working with Hansen-Ross Pottery, Stoneware, Glaze, L to R: 1986, 1973, 2001, 7 X 5 cm, 6 X 8 cm, 5 X 5 cm, Collection of Maureen Knox.

Folmer Hansen and David Ross considered themselves to be artist craftsmen and took a consciously non-industrial stance, placing considerable emphasis on making beautifully designed, handmade ceramics out of Saskatchewan clay.  As always, many factors play a part in the successful realization of any artistic practice or endeavor. In this case, the Saskatchewan Arts Board’s focus on adult education and its vision of a professional crafts industry in Saskatchewan helped to develop a wide audience for crafts. In the end, there are two components to the lasting legacy of this studio pottery in small town Saskatchewan. Hansen and Ross produced work on a small scale, primarily as a team of two, but periodically incorporating others, and this had an embracing and encouraging effect on many potters who are still working today. Hansen-Ross Pottery is one of the reasons that ceramics is still such a strong part of Saskatchewan’s art history and material culture. The other legacy is their beautiful pottery. There are thousands of finely made pots still sitting on the shelves of numerous kitchen cupboards and adorning china cabinets in Fort Qu’Appelle and far beyond. Increasingly, they are being acquired by art gallery and museum collections, but in Saskatchewan to this day, it is not uncommon to be served a cup of tea or coffee in a Hansen-Ross mug. At times, Hansen-Ross pottery has been honoured with exhibitions, but it is not the recognition that made them a success. It is their beautiful shape, glorious glazes and adept designs that set Hansen-Ross pottery apart from the rest; it is about how they are used or feel in one’s hand that makes them Canadian treasures.


Work from 10 Years of Collecting: Selected Works from the Permanent Collection 2004-2014

April 30 to September 6, 2015

Installation shot of 10 years of collecting exhibition.

Installation shot of 10 years of collecting exhibition.


Robert Scott - Copper Slag

February 5 to April 12, 2015

Robert Scott, The Falling, 2008, copper slag and Rhoplex (acrylic) on canvas, 97' X 73'

Robert Scott, The Falling, 2008, copper slag and Rhoplex (acrylic) on canvas, 97' X 73'

Robert Austin Scott, RCA, was born in 1941 in Melfort, Saskatchewan and spent part of his childhood in the town of LaFleche, in south-western Saskatchewan. He studied art at the Alberta College of Art, Calgary, AB, receiving a diploma in Applied Arts in 1969, and an MFA from the University of Alberta, Edmonton, in 1976. He has exhibited extensively throughout Canada and internationally, and has received numerous awards.

The paintings on exhibit here are made using black copper slag (an industrial waste material from a smelting process that is used as an abrasive in the blasting industry) with a bonding medium. The compositions are made by moving the material around dry on a flat canvas and then fixing it with rhoplex medium. Using an array of different implements (garden tools etc.) Scott makes profound compositions where chance is integral to the process.

He lives in Edmonton, AB and travels regularly to a renovated school studio, in Cadillac, Saskatchewan.


Carl Beam - The Columbus Suite

February 5 to April 12, 2015


Carl Beam, The Proper Way to Ride a Horse (Demonstration by Frank Cushing, ethnologist), 1990, etching on Arches paper, 47 1/2" X 31 1/2.

Carl Beam, The Proper Way to Ride a Horse (Demonstration by Frank Cushing, ethnologist), 1990, etching on Arches paper, 47 1/2" X 31 1/2.

This exhibition presents the work of well-known Canadian artist Carl Beam.  The Columbus Suite is a series of 12 prints that were completed in 1990 in response to the ‘celebration’ of the 500th anniversary of the European ‘discovery’ of the Americas.  Many people, including those whose ancestors were indigenous to North America, found the celebration ironic and troubling because it represented history as seen from only a European perspective.   In these images, Beam uses historic figures such as Christ, Riel, Sitting Bull, Einstein, Lincoln, Kennedy, Columbus, juxtaposed with numerous historical references and symbols, to make art work that represents a contrasting, yet balanced, assembly of heroes from different cultures.    As Beam writes, “My works are like little puzzles, interesting little games.  I play a game of dreaming ourselves as each other.  In this we find out that we’re all basically human.”  Carl Beam was from the M’Chigeeng First Nation and died in 2005.  


Moose Jaw Art Guild - 46th Annual Exhibition

December 4, 2014 to January 4, 2015

Members exhibiting: Jean Bell, Debbie Blash, Beth Crabb, Dale Duckworth, Lee Fast, Donna Hanslien, Roxanne Johnston, Jerry Kaiser, Bill Kruse, Glenda Loustel, Marlene McBain, Sidra Sheika, Cindy Perreault, Sheila Phillips, Grace Popyuk, Debbie Richards, Erica Silzer, Crystal Thorburn, Rhonda Wandler, Karen Walpole, Karen Whitney

Installation from Art Guild 2014 exhibition

Installation from Art Guild 2014 exhibition

Installation from Art Guild 2014 exhibition

Installation from Art Guild 2014 exhibition


Gabriela García-Luna, Pensive Space

September 18, 2014 to January 4, 2015

Gabriela García-Luna, Ghost City II

Gabriela García-Luna, Ghost City II

Gabriela García-Luna is a photography-based artist who lives and works between Moose Jaw, SK, northern India and Mexico City, where she was born and raised. She was invited to participate in   residencies at the Banff Centre and at La Chambre Blanche in Quebec City. Her work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibition most recently at SLATE Fine Art Gallery, Regina, at Illingworth Kerr Gallery, Calgary, and in the widely toured exhibition MIND THE GAP!, organized by the Dunlop Art Gallery.  Wayne Baerwaldt writes in the catalogue essay that, “As an artist who carefully constructs her photographic pictures to elude definitive and prescriptive readings, Gabriela García-Luna aims to open doors to an aesthetic that questions commonly perceived realities.  She suggests we observe her pictures with fewer, different or no expectations of knowing anything with any certainty and that another, more elusive quality is more revealing.  In the process of compiling her observations of the commonplace (urban-rural landscapes, ancient buildings, wallpaper, etc.) from various parts of the world, she hints at revealing the unseen in her images. She accomplishes this, in part, by subtly manipulating the quality of light/colouration of her surfaces.” This exhibition consists of work from a number of different series that each consist of beautiful, enigmatic images that both mystify and satisfy the viewer. 


Mindy Yan Miller, Feed

September 18, 2014 to December 28, 2014

Mindy Yan Miller, Feed

Mindy Yan Miller, Feed

In Mindy Yan Miller’s Saskatoon, Saskatchewan studio, the clothing of children, men and women is neatly laid out in a tender patterned order:  a child’s pair of brightly coloured, wear-softened canvas pants; a man’s acrylic sweater with a vibrant geometric design suggesting a little-used Christmas gift and a suit jacket, pressed and kept for best.  The clothes, emptied of the bodies that once burnished them, fill the width of translucent industrial netting, a material used by farmers to capture and shape the large round bales that mark the fields of contemporary farmlands in Saskatchewan.  Like clothing put away by a mourning relative or set aside for a now-grown child, they are taken “out of circulation,” frozen in time, as they are rolled into a bundle resembling both a hay bale and the clothing bundle of the vagabond or refugee, their ontologies fixed by an earlier incarnation.

Excerpt from Essay "Making Hay While the Sun Shines -or The Emperor's New Clothes."

Written by: Lisa Baldissera

Mindy Yan Miller’s artistic practice is rooted in fibre traditions and frequently uses masses of potent materials such as used clothing, human hair, or Coke cans. Her installations address themes of labour, identity, loss and commodification. She has exhibited in Canada, Europe and United States and currently lives in Saskatoon, SK. She holds an MFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design and since 1990 she has taught art as a sessional instructor at Concordia University in Montreal.


Les Manning: Common/Opposites

April 24 to August 31, 2014

Les Manning, Land Line, 2011, course textured stoneware with granite and perlite, smooth textured stoneware and celadon glaze, 23 X 47 X 33 cm  

Les Manning, Land Line, 2011, course textured stoneware with granite and perlite, smooth textured stoneware and celadon glaze, 23 X 47 X 33 cm

 

In a bold departure from the practice which the internationally renowned ceramist developed and refined over the last two decades, the 19 sculptures in Common/Opposites combine Les Manning’s expertise and skill as a ceramist with passion and playfulness. Manning’s new works show a rich emotional and metaphorical register while drawing deeply upon his personal experiences and knowledge of Canada’s lands. Juxtaposing forms, textures and colour, Manning evokes the monumental reach of modernism as an artistic endeavour. Playful references to the humble objects of everyday lighten his sophisticated and contemporary appreciation of the more base aspects of nature, to reveal the rich and contradictory poetry of our ordinary world.  

Les Manning was the Director of the Ceramic Studio at the Banff Centre for the Arts for 20 years, and has contributed to ceramics world-wide as a teacher, lecturer, conference and symposium participant and organizer, as well as Vice President of the International Academy of Ceramics, founding member and Vice-President of the Alberta Craft Council and first President of Canadian Craft Council. His work has been shown around the world, and is held in private, corporate and public collections, including the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Les Manning is the Senior Artist in Residence at the Shaw International Centre for Contemporary Ceramics, Medicine Hat Historic Clay District, Alberta, and received the Order of Canada in 2012.

~ Joanne Marion, Director/Curator of Art, Esplanade Arts & Heritage Centre


Carl Beam: From the Collection

January 31 to April 17, 2014

Carl Beam, Ch'ien T'ai k'un, 2000, acrylic and silkscreen on paper, 31.5" X 30"

Carl Beam, Ch'ien T'ai k'un, 2000, acrylic and silkscreen on paper, 31.5" X 30"

Emerging from Ojibwa and European descent, Beam resisted conventional categorizations of Native Art. Using mixed media, Beam collaged images drawn from Native and non-Native sources. This mode of representation deconstructed cultural assumptions and formulated new interpretations of history. His legacy continues to provoke questions that re-examine traditional mainstream views of Native identity by both Native and non-Native communities.


Alice Macredie: Cherished Memories of a Father's Career

January 31 to April 17, 2014

Alice Macredie, 1974, watercolour on paper, 10.5" X 14", in the collection of Exporail 1986.76.28

Alice Macredie, 1974, watercolour on paper, 10.5" X 14", in the collection of Exporail 1986.76.28

This exhibition features watercolors by this Moose Jaw-based artist. It is touring nationally by Exporail - the Canadian Railway Museum and features her work painted in memory of her father JRC Macredie, an engineer who help construct bridges such as the Lethbridge Viaduct and the Connaught Tunnel in Rogers Pass.


Maureen Newton: This is for the Birds

January 31 to April 17, 2014

Maureen Newton, Chick #6, 2009, 24" x 18", oil on panel (with removable dress)

Maureen Newton, Chick #6, 2009, 24" x 18", oil on panel (with removable dress)

This exhibition highlights new oil paintings that characterize rich coloration, bold compositions, and gently humorous depictions of life's serious - and not so serious - situations. This exhibition was curated by Joanne Marion for the Esplanade Art Gallery in Medicine Hat.